Alice Mohor

Meet Featured Author Alice Mohor!

Join us for a Meet the Author Story Time on Saturday, April 21 at 1:00pm.

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1. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I am a retired elementary P. E. teacher, and I first wrote rhyming poetry for my elementary P. E. students.

2. What do you do when you are not writing?

I like to visit with my family and with my friends. I also like to read and discuss books with a group of friends.

3. When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

When I wanted to share something that I had written.

4. What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I often get an idea for a poem when I am trying to fall asleep. I keep a lighted pen and paper pads on my bedside table and often fall asleep while writing.

5. Do you have an upcoming book? If so, can you tell us a little bit about it?

Yes, I just published a second book of poetry, Shared Days, about two people learning how to love each other while living together.

6. Is anything in your book based on real life experiences or purely all imagination?

All of my poetry is based on my experience or understanding of real events.

7. What was your favorite part to write and why?

My favorite poems are about the ordinary days in life that feel special when we remember them.

8. Who is an author that you look up to today?

Mary Oliver

9. What is your favorite genre of book to read?

I like to read books about real things.

10. What is your favorite book?

The Thesaurus.

11. Who is an author that has inspired you or influenced you growing up?

Mother Goose, Dr. Seuss, Robert Frost, Stephen Vincent Benet, and Edgar Allan Poe.

12. Who is an author that has inspired you more recently?

Edna St. Vincent Millay.

13. Do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers?

Yes, try to write something every day.  Practice will make you better.

14. Is there anything that you would like to say to your readers?  

Yes, if you will keep reading, I will keep writing.

 

Books that Feel Like Spring

Whether unconsciously or intentionally, we often gravitate toward books that evoke the season that surrounds us. Spring reads are breaths of fresh air. They clear away the winter gloom and fill the reader with a sense of hope that mirrors the bright blossoms of the season. 

Picture Books

When Mae’s family moves to a new home, she wishes she could bring her garden with her. She’ll miss the apple trees, the daffodils, and chasing butterflies in the wavy grass. But there’s no room for a garden in the city. Or is there?

The colorful illustrations and feeling of starting anew that this book brings will be sure to inspire you for spring. 

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This story of a girl and a duckling who share a touching year together will melt hearts old and young. In this tenderly funny book, girl and duckling grow in their understanding of what it is to care for each other, discovering that love is as much about letting go as it is about holding tight. Children and parents together will adore this fond exploration of growing up while learning about the joys of love offered and love returned.

This book is a great celebration of the excitement and joy that comes from knowing spring will return. 

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From the acclaimed author/artist of Beyond the Pond and Rulers of the Playground comes a breathtaking new book. Each day, the big trucks go to work. They scoop and hoist and push. But when Digger discovers something growing in the rubble, he sets in motion a series of events that will change him, and the city, forever.

Is there any season better represented by tenderness, care, and new life? This book is the perfect spring read. 

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Middle Grades Books

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Orphaned Kit Tyler knows, as she gazes at the cold, bleak shores of Connecticut Colony, that her new home will never be like the shimmering Caribbean island she left behind. In her relatives' stern Puritan community, she feels like a tropical bird that has flown to the wrong part of the world, a bird that is now caged and lonely. The only place where Kit feels completely free is in the meadows, where she enjoys the company of the old Quaker woman known as the Witch of Blackbird Pond, and on occasion, her young sailor friend Nat. But when Kit's friendship with the "witch" is discovered, Kit is faced with suspicion, fear, and anger.

This historical fiction will make you want to spread out a picnic blanket in a meadow of your own.

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Rafael has dreams. Every chance he gets he plays in the street games trying to build his skills, get noticed by scouts, and someday play Major League Baseball. Maya has worries. The bees are dying all over the world, and the company her father works for is responsible, making products that harm the environment. Follow Rafael and Maya in a story that shifts back and forth in time and place, from Rafael’s neighborhood in the Dominican Republic to present-day Minnesota, where Maya and her sister are following Rafael's first year in the minor leagues. In their own ways, Maya and Rafael search for hope, face difficult choices, and learn a secret the same secret that forever changes how they see the world.

Bees and baseball? Sounds like spring to me.

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In the valley of Fruitless Mountain, a young girl named Minli spends her days working hard in the fields and her nights listening to her father spin fantastic tales about the Jade Dragon and the Old Man of the Moon. Minli's mother, tired of their poor life, chides him for filling her head with nonsense. But Minli believes these enchanting stories and embarks on an extraordinary journey to find the Old Man of the Moon and ask him how her family can change their fortune. She encounters an assorted cast of characters and magical creatures along the way, including a dragon who accompanies her on her quest.

Minli's hopefulness in this adventure is catching. You may just wander out into an adventure of your own.

 

Early Young Adult & Classics

A captivating tale, from bestselling and award-winning author, that reveals the healing power of duty and honour, love and honey.

Mirasol is a beekeeper, a honey-gatherer, with an ability to speak to the "earthlines"—the sentient parts of Willowlands, where she lives. The concerns of Master, Chalice, and Circle, who govern Willowlands, have nothing to do with her-until the current Master and Chalice die in a fire and leave no heirs to take their places. The Master's closest relative has been a priest of Fire for the past seven years; he is not quite human anymore. And then the Circle comes to Marisol and tells her that she is the new Chalice, and it will be up to her to bind the land and its people with a Master, the touch of whose hand can burn human flesh to the bone.

Bees again. Hope and life (both new and maintained) are key elements in this tale reminiscent of a fairy story. This is one that surprised me in my first reading, and I keep returning to it.

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What happens when the most beautiful girl in the world marries the handsomest prince of all time and he turns out to be...well...a lot less than the man of her dreams? As a boy, William Goldman claims, he loved to hear his father read the S. Morgenstern classic, The Princess Bride. But as a grown-up he discovered that the boring parts were left out of good old Dad's recitation, and only the "good parts" reached his ears. Now Goldman does Dad one better. He's reconstructed the "Good Parts Version" to delight wise kids and wide-eyed grownups everywhere. What's it about? Fencing. Fighting. True Love. Strong Hate. Harsh Revenge. A Few Giants. Lots of Bad Men. Lots of Good Men. Five or Six Beautiful Women. Beasties Monstrous and Gentle. Some Swell Escapes and Captures. Death, Lies, Truth, Miracles. In short, it's about everything.

The Princess Bride is a book?! Inconceivable! And it's just as good as the movie.

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Everyone's favorite redhead, the spunky Anne Shirley, begins her adventures at Green Gables, a farm outside Avonlea, Prince Edward Island. When the freckled girl realizes that the elderly Cuthberts wanted to adopt a boy instead, she begins to try to win them and, consequently, the reader, over.

If Anne Shirley is not the embodiment of hopefulness, then I don't know who is.

 

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Alison Broderick

Meet Featured Author Alison Broderick!

Join us for a Meet the Author Story Time on Saturday, March 24 at 1:00pm.

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1. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

Ever since I was a little girl, I have dreamed of being a children's author. I am a Georgia native who grew up in the Snellville area. I went to Shiloh High School, and when I was a senior (age 17), my English teacher asked us to create a poem based on the writings of award-winning writer Shel Silverstein. That is when I penned my first book, Samuel Stanley Scotty Snight. My family encouraged me time and again to get the book published, but I never received acceptance from any of the larger publishing companies. I thought my dream was unrealistic and considered it a nice fantasy, at the very least. You can imagine my sheer excitement when Willow Moon Publishing contacted me in 2017, at the age of 37, wanting to publish my book.

2. What do you do when you are not writing?

I work in the mental health field as a marketing and alumni professional, so I help support individuals after they've completed residential treatment at our facility. We offer treatment for drug and alcohol addiction, eating disorders, trauma, chronic pain, and mood and anxiety disorders. It is so rewarding to see those who were once struggling become healthy, productive members of society. I am also a Barre3 instructor at a Barre3 studio near my home in East Cobb/Marietta. And, I love spending time with my family - husband, two boys and Golden Retriever, Duke.

3. When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

Honestly, I think I came to this realization during the first five seconds post-womb. :-)

4. What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I would definitely say I have a touch of ADD, so sitting still is difficult for me. Oftentimes when I experience a writer's block, I have to take a break - maybe walk the dog, do laundry or visit with a friend - to break the block.

5. Do you have an upcoming book? If so, can you tell us a little bit about it?

I am writing a series about personal hygiene. My next book is currently in the works - it's about a little girl who refuses to wash her hands.

6. Is anything in your book based on real life experiences or purely all imagination?

Imagination and real life (experiences with my own children)

7. What was your favorite chapter (or part) to write and why?

There are no chapters; it's a picture book. My favorite spread is when Sammy sits on the school bus next to a girl he thinks is neat, but his breath is so stinky that she quickly changes seats. Mina's illustrations really made my story come to life!

8. Who is an author that you look up to today?

I believe it will always be Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss). He helped pave the way for children's books writers like myself. And in some odd way, I find comfort in knowing that he was rejected 27 times before his first book was published.

9. What is your favorite genre of book to read?

Personally, I love reading biographies.

10. What is your favorite book?

Favorite Children's Book: The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Favorite Adult Book: Left To Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust by Immaculee Ilibagiza

11. Who is an author that has inspired you or influenced you growing up?

Shel Silverstein - as a kid, I loved Where the Sidewalk Ends. His style of writing was my inspiration for Samuel Stanley Scotty Snight.

12. Do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers?

Don't give up. When I used to hear this as a kid and even into my 20s, I would brush it off or maybe even roll my eyes if no one was looking. But really, just don't give up. I was 17 when I wrote my book, and I was 37 when it was accepted. Perseverance, patience and a lot of prayer. If you believe it will happen, it will happen.

 

Books for Boys

Once they graduate to chapter books, many girls take to reading like a fish to water. Boys, on the other hand, not so much. Boys often have a harder time diving into the literary world after picture books. Here are a few recommendations for your boys who just haven't found that book that hooks them into the reading life.

For the detective

 Nate the Great Series for Beginning Readers  Nate the Great has a new case! His friend Annie has lost a picture. She wants Nate to help her find it. Nate the Great must get all the facts, ask the right questions, and narrow the list of suspects so he can solve the mystery.

Nate the Great Series for Beginning Readers

Nate the Great has a new case! His friend Annie has lost a picture. She wants Nate to help her find it. Nate the Great must get all the facts, ask the right questions, and narrow the list of suspects so he can solve the mystery.

 The Hardy Boys Series for Middle Readers  The Hardy Boys are two brothers, Frank and Joe Hardy. They are average teenagers with a strong combination of inquisitiveness and curiosity. With such a potent combination, they operate as part time detectives and solve a great many mysteries

The Hardy Boys Series for Middle Readers

The Hardy Boys are two brothers, Frank and Joe Hardy. They are average teenagers with a strong combination of inquisitiveness and curiosity. With such a potent combination, they operate as part time detectives and solve a great many mysteries

 

For the athletically inclined

 Tim Green's Books for Middle Readers  Bestselling author and former NFL player Tim Green scores a touchdown with this exhilarating books. Green's books are action-packed adventures with gripping suspense, heroes you can really root for, and an insider’s look at the worlds of professional football and baseball.

Tim Green's Books for Middle Readers

Bestselling author and former NFL player Tim Green scores a touchdown with this exhilarating books. Green's books are action-packed adventures with gripping suspense, heroes you can really root for, and an insider’s look at the worlds of professional football and baseball.

 

For the graphically inclined

Don't be dismayed by the thickness of these books, they're full of pictures!

 Timeless Series for Middle Readers   The world did not end. At least not permanently. The Time Collision came from beyond the stars, a cosmic event that fractured time and space, tearing apart the earth and reshaping it into something entirely new. This is the world Diego Ribera was born into. The past, present, and future coexisting together. In New Chicago, Diego’s middle school hallways buzz with kids from all eras of history and from cultures all over the world. The pieces do not always fit together neatly, but this is the world he loves. There are those, however, who do not share his affection.  With more than 150 full-color illustrations.

Timeless Series for Middle Readers

The world did not end. At least not permanently. The Time Collision came from beyond the stars, a cosmic event that fractured time and space, tearing apart the earth and reshaping it into something entirely new.This is the world Diego Ribera was born into. The past, present, and future coexisting together. In New Chicago, Diego’s middle school hallways buzz with kids from all eras of history and from cultures all over the world. The pieces do not always fit together neatly, but this is the world he loves. There are those, however, who do not share his affection.

With more than 150 full-color illustrations.

  The Invention of Hugo Cabret  for Middle Readers  Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

The Invention of Hugo Cabret for Middle Readers

Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

 

For those who "just want to read about real life"

 Henry Huggins Series for Beginning-Middle Readers  Just as Henry Huggins is complaining that nothing exciting ever happens, a friendly dog sits down beside him and looks pleadingly at his ice-cream cone. From that moment on, the two are inseparable. But when Ribsy's original owner appears, trying to reclaim his dog, Henry's faced with the possibility of losing his new best friend. Has Klickitat Street seen the last of rambunctious Ribsy?

Henry Huggins Series for Beginning-Middle Readers

Just as Henry Huggins is complaining that nothing exciting ever happens, a friendly dog sits down beside him and looks pleadingly at his ice-cream cone. From that moment on, the two are inseparable. But when Ribsy's original owner appears, trying to reclaim his dog, Henry's faced with the possibility of losing his new best friend. Has Klickitat Street seen the last of rambunctious Ribsy?

  The Wednesday Wars  for Middle Readers  Meet Holling Hoodhood, a seventh-grader at Camillo Junior High, who must spend Wednesday afternoons with his teacher, Mrs. Baker, while the rest of the class has religious instruction. Mrs. Baker doesn’t like Holling—he’s sure of it. Why else would she make him read the plays of William Shakespeare outside class? But everyone has bigger things to worry about, like Vietnam. His father wants Holling and his sister to be on their best behavior: the success of his business depends on it. But how can Holling stay out of trouble when he has so much to contend with? A bully demanding cream puffs; angry rats; and a baseball hero signing autographs the very same night Holling has to appear in a play in yellow tights! As fate sneaks up on him again and again, Holling finds Motivation—the Big M—in the most unexpected places and musters up the courage to embrace his destiny, in spite of himself.

The Wednesday Wars for Middle Readers

Meet Holling Hoodhood, a seventh-grader at Camillo Junior High, who must spend Wednesday afternoons with his teacher, Mrs. Baker, while the rest of the class has religious instruction. Mrs. Baker doesn’t like Holling—he’s sure of it. Why else would she make him read the plays of William Shakespeare outside class? But everyone has bigger things to worry about, like Vietnam. His father wants Holling and his sister to be on their best behavior: the success of his business depends on it. But how can Holling stay out of trouble when he has so much to contend with? A bully demanding cream puffs; angry rats; and a baseball hero signing autographs the very same night Holling has to appear in a play in yellow tights! As fate sneaks up on him again and again, Holling finds Motivation—the Big M—in the most unexpected places and musters up the courage to embrace his destiny, in spite of himself.

For those who love adventure

  Pax  for Middle Readers  ax was only a kit when his family was killed, and “his boy” Peter rescued him from abandonment and certain death. Now the war front approaches, and when Peter’s father enlists, Peter has to move in with his grandpa. Far worse than being forced to leave home is the fact that Pax can’t go. Peter listens to his stern father—as he usually does—and throws Pax’s favorite toy soldier into the woods. When the fox runs to retrieve it, Peter and his dad get back in the car and leave him there—alone. But before Peter makes it through even one night under his grandfather’s roof, regret and duty spur him to action; he packs for a trek to get his best friend back and sneaks into the night. This is the story of Peter, Pax, and their independent struggles to return to one another against all odds.

Pax for Middle Readers

ax was only a kit when his family was killed, and “his boy” Peter rescued him from abandonment and certain death. Now the war front approaches, and when Peter’s father enlists, Peter has to move in with his grandpa. Far worse than being forced to leave home is the fact that Pax can’t go. Peter listens to his stern father—as he usually does—and throws Pax’s favorite toy soldier into the woods. When the fox runs to retrieve it, Peter and his dad get back in the car and leave him there—alone. But before Peter makes it through even one night under his grandfather’s roof, regret and duty spur him to action; he packs for a trek to get his best friend back and sneaks into the night. This is the story of Peter, Pax, and their independent struggles to return to one another against all odds.

  Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library  for Middle Readers  Kyle Keeley is the class clown, popular with most kids, (if not the teachers), and an ardent fan of all games: board games, word games, and particularly video games. His hero, Luigi Lemoncello, the most notorious and creative gamemaker in the world, just so happens to be the genius behind the building of the new town library.  Lucky Kyle wins a coveted spot to be one of the first 12 kids in the library for an overnight of fun, food, and lots and lots of games. But when morning comes, the doors remain locked. Kyle and the other winners must solve every clue and every secret puzzle to find the hidden escape route. And the stakes are very high.

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library for Middle Readers

Kyle Keeley is the class clown, popular with most kids, (if not the teachers), and an ardent fan of all games: board games, word games, and particularly video games. His hero, Luigi Lemoncello, the most notorious and creative gamemaker in the world, just so happens to be the genius behind the building of the new town library.

Lucky Kyle wins a coveted spot to be one of the first 12 kids in the library for an overnight of fun, food, and lots and lots of games. But when morning comes, the doors remain locked. Kyle and the other winners must solve every clue and every secret puzzle to find the hidden escape route. And the stakes are very high.

 The Hero Series for Middle Readers  Hero, a retired search-and-rescue dog, is not prepared for a stray puppy to come into his life. But when he and twelve-year-old Ben find Scout injured and afraid, the new addition leads them down an unexpected and dangerous path.  When Scout goes missing, it's up to Hero to use his search-and-rescue skills to find Scout and bring him home.

The Hero Series for Middle Readers

Hero, a retired search-and-rescue dog, is not prepared for a stray puppy to come into his life. But when he and twelve-year-old Ben find Scout injured and afraid, the new addition leads them down an unexpected and dangerous path.

When Scout goes missing, it's up to Hero to use his search-and-rescue skills to find Scout and bring him home.

 

For the history buff

 The I Survived Series for Middle Readers  Several of the  most harrowing or terrifying events in history are brought vividly to life in this new fictional series!

The I Survived Series for Middle Readers

Several of the  most harrowing or terrifying events in history are brought vividly to life in this new fictional series!

 

For those with big imaginations

 The Fly Guy Series for Beginning Readers  When Buzz captures a fly to enter in The Amazing Pet Show, his parents and the judges tell him that a fly cannot be a pet, but Fly Guy proves them wrong.

The Fly Guy Series for Beginning Readers

When Buzz captures a fly to enter in The Amazing Pet Show, his parents and the judges tell him that a fly cannot be a pet, but Fly Guy proves them wrong.

 The Magic Tree House Series for Beginning Readers  Jack and Annie wonder: Where did the tree house come from?  Before they can find out, the mysterious tree house whisks them to the past. Now they have to figure out how to get home.

The Magic Tree House Series for Beginning Readers

Jack and Annie wonder: Where did the tree house come from?

Before they can find out, the mysterious tree house whisks them to the past. Now they have to figure out how to get home.

 The Chronicles of Narnia Series for Middle Readers  Journeys to the end of the world, fantastic creatures, and epic battles between good and evil—what more could any reader ask for in one book? The book that has it all is  The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe , written in 1949 by Clive Staples Lewis. But Lewis did not stop there. Six more books followed, and together they became known as The Chronicles of Narnia.

The Chronicles of Narnia Series for Middle Readers

Journeys to the end of the world, fantastic creatures, and epic battles between good and evil—what more could any reader ask for in one book? The book that has it all is The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, written in 1949 by Clive Staples Lewis. But Lewis did not stop there. Six more books followed, and together they became known as The Chronicles of Narnia.

Want more options of great books for your boys? The Read-Aloud Revival just posted their list of recommendations!

Lawrence "Chip" Quammen

Meet Featured Indie Author Lawrence "Chip" Quammen!

Join us for a Meet the Author Event on Saturday, March 17 at 1:00pm.

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1. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

My wife, Dr. Robecca Quammen, and I reside in Monroe, Georgia and Montverde, Florida. I started my medical career as the first PA in Walton County in 1974 when I joined Dr. Howard Barton in his practice in Social Circle, Georgia. After several years of practice in Walton County I took a position with Georgia Baptist Medical Center, Atlanta, as a medical provider with the Life Flight Helicopter program. I later became director of the program. Over the next several years I spent most of my time in emergency medicine and occupational medicine. After 23 years in practice I retired to join my wife in the medical information systems and management consultancy she founded and continued to serve in that capacity for another 18 years. We purchased a home in Monroe 2 years ago to be closer to our granddaughters.

2. What do you do when you are not writing?

I am a dedicated leisure reader and also enjoy music, art, and motorcycle riding. In addition, I serve weekly as a volunteer with The Good News Club, a faith-based after school program for elementary school children.  I also serve weekly as a volunteer for Team Up Mentoring, a faith-based organization that serves children, youth, and young adults ages 3 to 21 who have a history of adverse childhood events and trauma. I serve with Team Up as a mentor and recently accepted a position as chairman of their Board of Directors. I am a strong advocate of reading programs for all children.

3. When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

As much as I love to read, I never considered writing a book until 4 years ago. I was working on an extended consulting engagement for a hospital system in East Texas and was having supper one summer evening in a local restaurant when a great idea occurred to me. My great idea was based on the tradition my father established early in my childhood of writing short stories during his time away at work for his children. My father’s job required that he travel weekly to locations in Georgia, Tennessee, Florida, and Alabama. During those nights in motel rooms across the south he would jot down short stories about the antics of three mice who happened to be sisters. On arriving home each Friday evening he would have a new story to tell his children. My idea was to use the three sisters my father created as the principal characters in a book dedicated to my granddaughters in honor of my father. Since the original stories only lived for a short time on assorted scraps of paper and restaurant napkins, my task was to write all new adventures with lots of new characters. As the writing progressed, one book became a trilogy. 

4. What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I’m not sure it is interesting or unique but I do all my writing long hand on a legal pad before transferring it to an online format.

5. Do you have an upcoming book? If so, can you tell us a little bit about it?

Yes, the book described above is named Evergreen and it is the first book of a trilogy named “The Adventures of Pouxie, Mouxie and Chrissie.”

6. Is anything in your book based on real life experiences or purely all imagination?

Pouxie, Mouxie and Chrissie, three sisters who are the principal characters, came from my father’s imagination. Otherwise, all the other characters, all of the adventures, the book title, and the related trilogy are entirely the product of my imagination.

7. What was your favorite chapter (or part) to write and why?

I will be reading from chapter 12, “Papa Takes a Walk,” during the Meet the Author Event.  I enjoyed writing this chapter because it was the first time since starting the book that I was able to use the sisters number one antagonist, “Sweetpea,” in a fast moving story line that involved the sisters, their parents and the amazing trio, the Crow Brothers: Archie, Festus, and Sam.

8. Who is an author that you look up to today?

For overall excellence as a writer and master of his craft: Stephen King.

9. What is your favorite genre of book to read?

My tastes vary widely. Of course there are the children’s classics. I also enjoy mystery, suspense, action stories, horror, and comedy.

10. What is your favorite book?

A very hard question to answer. If I have to pick just one I will pick The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemmingway.  Simple but profound.

11. Is there any particular authors or books that influenced you growing up?

C.S. Lewis for the Chronicles of Narnia series, Lewis Carroll for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, J.R.R. Tolkien for The Hobbit, Rudyard Kipling for The Jungle Book, and E.B. White for Charlotte’s Web, to name a few.

12. Who is an author that has inspired you?

Edgar Allan Poe, for an absolutely incredible imagination.

13. Do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers?

Read, Read, Read; don’t limit your imagination, and don’t be afraid to step out of the box.

14. Is there anything that you would like to say to your readers?

Read, Read, Read; feed your imagination daily from a variety of sources, and don’t be afraid to step out of the box.